Went thrift store shopping with Ricky J. Hernandez today.  Between four shops and thrift store row, came home with these treasures, including the red plaid blanket.  

[Pachuco statue, George Washington shilhouette, book on the origins of photography, a 55mm red filter for b&w photography, a Kodak Disc4000 camera, a vintage Joseph Conrad book, set of 3 wooden wall art panels, a new desk accessory, a 2 gallon Ball glass jar, soup ladel (been needing one of these!), metal ice cream scoop (now we want ice cream), and a glass citrus reamer (really wanted the white glass Sunkist one, but it was twice as expensive), and the red plaid blanket] = approx $61 +lunch +a happy Saturday afternoon with my other half.

asianhistory
theatlantic:

The Case for Helping Syria’s Children — 100 Years Ago

One hundred years ago, when the United States faced a choice to become involved with a human rights crisis in territory now divided into Syria, Turkey, and Armenia, we chose to stay out. After ethnic Armenians were massacred by the Ottomans during World War I, President Wilson urged Congress to help the remaining population establish a country of their own. But, claiming that the American public wouldn’t support such an intervention, Congress said no.
Spooky, isn’t it?
On the night of April 24, 1915, Ottoman soldiers arrested more than 200 ethnic Armenian leaders and intellectuals in the empire’s capital city, Constantinople. The men were later executed at a prison in inner Anatolia, which is part of modern-day Turkey. Over the next seven years, an estimated 1.5 million Armenians died during death marches through the Syrian desert, mass executions, and epidemics at the open-air camps where they were held, many of which were located in what is now called Syria.
Read more. [Image: Library of Congress]

theatlantic:

The Case for Helping Syria’s Children — 100 Years Ago

One hundred years ago, when the United States faced a choice to become involved with a human rights crisis in territory now divided into Syria, Turkey, and Armenia, we chose to stay out. After ethnic Armenians were massacred by the Ottomans during World War I, President Wilson urged Congress to help the remaining population establish a country of their own. But, claiming that the American public wouldn’t support such an intervention, Congress said no.

Spooky, isn’t it?

On the night of April 24, 1915, Ottoman soldiers arrested more than 200 ethnic Armenian leaders and intellectuals in the empire’s capital city, Constantinople. The men were later executed at a prison in inner Anatolia, which is part of modern-day Turkey. Over the next seven years, an estimated 1.5 million Armenians died during death marches through the Syrian desert, mass executions, and epidemics at the open-air camps where they were held, many of which were located in what is now called Syria.

Read more. [Image: Library of Congress]

fuckyeahmexico

fernandosica:

Client: Conoce DF

Project: México City Historic Center Tourist Map

Many of the most visited tourist attractions in Mexico City are concentrated in the Historic Center, so i was asked to illustrate some of the most important places for a touristic map called “Conoce DF”.

It was a challenge to illustrate and abstract such beautiful and complex architecture. This is the first half of illustrations! Hope you like it! :)

 

www.fernandosica.com

nprfreshair

Epitaph

When I die
Give what’s left of me away
To children
And old men that wait to die.
And if you need to cry,
Cry for your brother
Walking the street beside you.
And when you need me,
Put your arms
Around anyone
And give them
What you need to give to me.

I want to leave you something,
Something better
Than words
Or sounds.

Look for me
In the people I’ve known
Or loved,
And if you cannot give me away,
At least let me live on your eyes
And not on your mind.

You can love me most
By letting
Hands touch hands,
By letting
Bodies touch bodies,
And by letting go
Of children
That need to be free.

Love doesn’t die,
People do.
So, when all that’s left of me
Is love,
Give me away.

- Merritt Malloy


Noticing this morning’s reblog from Humans of New York, our producer Phyllis Myers was reminded of this poem, which is a favorite of hers, and it’s so lovely I wanted to pass it along to the rest of you.
(via nprfreshair)